Tomor and Matteo

by Kelsey Zalimeni

An encounter with 'Tomor and Matteo' epitomizes the term phenomenological experience. The digital sculpture installation requires the viewer to be active and aware of their own body in the space. Feuerman's choice to install the piece on the floor hearkens to a similar mechanism made famous by minimalist sculptor Carl Andre, forcing the audience to orient themselves about the piece as it occupies the ground they walk on.

'Tomor and Matteo in the Pool', 2010    Oil on Resin, Video Projection, Ceramic Tile, 120 x 96 inches

'Tomor and Matteo in the Pool', 2010

Oil on Resin, Video Projection, Ceramic Tile, 120 x 96 inches

This piece was part of Carole's 2010 El Paso Museum retrospective exhibition, aptly titled 'Earth Water Air Fire.'  The installation was certainly a highlight of the show, inhabiting its own viewing room complete with a 40-foot high digital projector suspended from the ceiling. The following video features a tour of the El Paso exhibition:


The depicted scene comes from a common, everyday experience, yet there is something ritualistic about the interaction.  Perhaps the very nature of sharing (the pool, the beach ball, a glance) causes the piece to shine as sacred.  This video below offers a glimpse of the installation in depth.

What do you think of Matteo and Tomor? Share thoughts, comments, and questions for Carole below!

Tree

by Kelsey Zalimeni

Carole Feuerman's 'Tree' invests the human form with refreshing simplicity and innocent purity.  Delicately posed with a downward gaze, the figure emanates a coy comfortability in her state of exposure.  Her slender frame and dainty features imply both a gentle nature and physical youth.

'Tree with Leaves' , 2011   Oil on Resin Sculpture with Interactive Projection, Dimensions Variable, Private Collection

'Tree with Leaves', 2011

Oil on Resin Sculpture with Interactive Projection, Dimensions Variable, Private Collection

The swim cap upon her head is green and leafy, purposing itself as an organic adornment in place of its usual utility role. The tree stump beneath the figure reinforces the naturalistic theme while serving as a pedestal.  Tying the piece together is the multicolor digital projection of leaves onto the surface.  This mechanism adds a layer of complexity to the work, as it fuses a classic form of artmaking with new media. This sculpture floats between dreamlike and realist, innocence and confidence... which, in turn, is truly ideal.