My Summer as Carole Feuerman's Intern

This summer, I graciously accepted an internship at Carole Feuerman's Studio, the Second LSC,  in NYC. Beginning in May, I came into the studio 4 days a week, for about 8 hours a day. Having spent most of my summers life guarding or at camp, the 9-5 lifestyle was completely new to me. I embarked on this journey with no real expectations and an open mind.

As my last day at Carole Feuerman Studio comes to a close I can say that I have learned more here to prepare me for the art world than I have in any classroom (shh don't tell my professors). Carole is a seasoned artists whose knowledge extends far beyond making beautiful work. While interning, I got to work in a variety of jobs including fabrication, inventory, and social media. I am so grateful to have gotten the opportunity to learn directly from her as well as her extremely talented crew. I can not express how wonderful it was to work with such a skillfully diverse team of painters, fabricators, and assistants. It truly awes me how much this team is able to accomplish.

Couldn't leave without taking a few snapchat selfies with my girl, Kendall! Based on image the second image, maybe it's better if we don't swap faces...

 

Upon reflecting on everything I have learned during my time here, here are a few lessons that have stuck out to me:

 

1. Do not be tentative.

This one I definitely still have some work on, but while working in fabrication at the studio I learned how crucial it is to not be cautious. This is a lesson I plan to take back with me to art school and other facets of my life. It is important to take risks and make mistakes. Sometimes its okay to overdo something or even break it, it can always be fixed or done again. Its that extra punch of dark in the drawing or red pigment in the face that makes a finished piece.

2. The art world is always on the move.

One of my jobs while working here was to keep inventory of Carole's art and let me tell you there is A LOT of it. Carole's inventory always needs updating. Everyday we have sculptures being shipped and sold around the world. This studio's ability to manage Carole's extensive registry of art has been so crucial to her international success.

3. Take your inspiration and push boundaries.

Carole can draw inspiration from the most unexpected places. Sometimes its a simple object like a chair or mirror, sometimes its a person she meets, sometimes its a story she reads. Carole's mind is always on the move to do something new and unexpected. In her art, she looks to push boundaries, playing it safe is not her style. Whether its building a 4 ton bronze sculpture on 6 inch wrists that withstands earthquakes, or inventing a brand new technique to paint with bronze, Carole has the passion and drive to make her wildest ideas come to life.

4. Even the best artists need to understand business.

There is no doubt that Carole is an extremely talented artists, but what has impressed me most is her ability to manage her business. At the end of the day you need to sell art to make it, and Carole works with her galleries as a seasoned expert. While interning here I got to witness and partake in the behind scenes work that goes into Carole Feuerman Sculpture. There is so much more to being a fine artist than I had ever expected.

 

I'd like to thank everyone at the studio for all of their generosity in these past 3 months! I look forward to taking everything that I have learned with me as I venture back to St. Louis for my sophomore year at Wash. U! Over and out!

Carole, David and I Stopped by a photo booth today after a great lunch at the John Dory Oyster Bar in the Ace Hotel!

 - Post by Dana Citrin