public art

Feuerman Exhibiting Two Monumental Painted Bronzes at Palazzo Mora Nearing the End: The closing of the Venice Biennale by Carole Feuerman

The Palazzo is located directly on the Strada Nuova, in Venice, Cannaregio.

The exhibition can be visited, by free entry, from May 9 until 22 November 2015,

daily 10.00 - 18.00h , Tuesdays closed.

For more information please visit www.palazzomora.org

Every two years, the city of Venice, an island solely linked by canals and bridges, referred to as “The Floating City” becomes inundated with art during the Venice Biennale, a worldly happening that absolutely everyone wants to be seen at, and that every artist wants to be shown at. This year Feuerman is showing two monumental painted bronzes made especially for the event and brought to you by Global Art Affairs.

Be sure to see Carole Feuerman’s Leda and the Swan and DurgaMa before time runs out on November 22nd, also recommended by http://www.slowtraveldiary.com/slow-living/travel-photo-carole-feuerman-venice-biennale/ and http://www.demotix.com/search/media/feuerman

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   Detail:  Leda and the Swan , 2014, Oil on Resin, 42 x 80 x 90 inches.

Detail: Leda and the Swan, 2014, Oil on Resin, 42 x 80 x 90 inches.

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      Leda and the Swan   , 2014, Oil on Resin, 42 x 80 x 90 inches.

Leda and the Swan, 2014, Oil on Resin, 42 x 80 x 90 inches.

During the Renaissance, Venice was the center for commerce and art, and propelled the field of art. Carole’s interest in Classicism and creating idealized forms embodies the artistic ideals of the Renaissance. Representing classical and idealized figures combined with a hyper-realistic style creates a genre that any Renaissance artist would find innovative. Furthermore, the inspiration behind many of Carole’s pieces harken back to Greek mythology. For example, Carole’s Leda and the Swan is based on the myth of Zeus and Leda, where Zeus disguises himself as a swan in order to seduce the beautiful Leda, from which Leda bore Helen of Troy. The Leda and the Swan depiction emerged more prominently as a classicizing theme during the Italian Renaissance, even Leonardo Da Vinci depicted the tale. In Carole’s rendering, a reclining Leda donning a vintage women’s swimsuit and cap relaxes her body against the top of an inflatable swan, forming an elegant curve that begins at the swan’s neck and travels to its tail.

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                                                              DurgaMa   , 2015, Oil on Bronze, 101 x 90 x 91 inches. 

                                                      DurgaMa, 2015, Oil on Bronze, 101 x 90 x 91 inches. 

Conversely, Carole’s DurgaMa derives not from western art but rather explores the tranquility found in eastern traditions. DurgaMa is an ascending beauty that represents the cycles of existence. The lotus reflects a sense of spiritual awakening and rebirth. Similarly, the meditative female Indian that serenely rests atop the flower hang strives to reach contentment and enlightenment. From the stem of the lotus to the top the crown DurgaMa chronicles the soul’s journey from worldly influences and materialization to transcendence and enlightenment. It is a remarkable piece that one should not miss seeing. Over 200,000 people have visited Leda and the Swan and DurgaMa through the summer of 2015. Carole has been exhibiting at the Venice Biennale since 2007 and looks forward to being part of the Venice Biennale in 2017!  Be sure to make a visit to Palazzo Mora to see these captivating sculptures in an ideal setting before the Biennale ends on November 22, 2015.

Behind the Scenes: Carole Feuerman perfecting Balance, soon to be exhibited at the National Hotel in Miami by Carole Feuerman

Video documentary of Carole Feuerman at work on her resin sculpture "Balance". Credit: Alvaro Corzo V. http://corzo360.com

Balance, 2012, Oil on Bronze, 32 x 26 x 17 inches. 

Watch artist Carole Feuerman at work, creating Balance. From precisely placing strokes of paint to strategically applying water drops, follow along and discover the process behind making these beautiful sculptures. With over 100 layers of paint, rigorous glazing and sanding it can take years to create these pieces. The minute details in the tiny water drops and wisps of hair, the precise application of eyebrows and eyelashes all must be perfect in order to create such a realistic sculpture, and Carole Feuerman achieves just that. Complete with tan lines and water drops it is easy to imagine this swimmer resting in the lotus position whilst mediating after a long and demanding swim. 

Balance will be featured at the National Hotel in Miami, which is celebrating its 75th Anniversary during Miami Art Week. Miami Art Week takes place the first week of December and showcases over 20 art fairs accompanied by more than 100 events. http://www.miamiandbeaches.com/events/art-basel/art-festivals. This life-size sculpture fits perfectly within the Miami art scene, reflecting the notion that this sunny city revolves around warm weather and beaches. Additionally, as many art lovers know Miami Art Week can be rather hectic and overwhelming, therefore, serene and delicate Balance becomes a reminder for visitors to rest, take a reprieve, and reflect in order to fully enjoy the amount of art this city has to offer. 

To see more videos of Carole at work please visit: http://www.carolefeuerman.com/videos-carole-and-her-work/

Monumental Quan, by Carole Feuerman finds a prestigious new home at the Lotte Palace Hotel by Carole Feuerman

Monumental Quan is proud to announce her new residence for the month of November at the Lotte New York Palace Hotel, located directly across from St. Patrick’s Cathedral. The grand Cathedral creates a beautiful backdrop when viewing Quan. In addition, Rockefeller Center is just a stone’s throw away. She is living the high life at this sumptuous hotel in the heart of Manhattan. http://www.lottenypalace.com

Monumental Quan, 2012, Bronze & Polished Aluminum. 67 x 70 x 43 inches, with Carole Feuerman

Monumental Quan, a larger than life female figure, rests peacefully atop an impressive stainless steel ball. Quan juxtaposes the courtyard aesthetic nicely, creating a dichotomy between contemporary and historical art. She provides a modern twist to this historic site. However, contemporary Quan does pay homage to traditional Buddhist beliefs. The title of this work is derived from the Chinese name for the 'goddess of compassion'. The name is short for Guanshiyin, which means 'observing the sounds and cries of the world. In Buddhist imagery, the goddess is depicted looking or glancing down, symbolizing her watching over the world. In Feuerman's sculpture, the figure's poise and yoga stance on top of the sphere are a metaphor for the world. Quan quintessentially exudes mental steadiness and emotional stability, calm behavior and judgment—very things the artist herself strives to achieve. 

Monumental Quan in The Courtyard of the Lotte New York Palace Hotel

The Lotte New York Palace Hotel is recognized for its supreme splendor, spectacular views, and unparalleled services and amenities. The hotel encompasses the historical Villard Mansion as well as a contemporary 55-foot tower. The bridge between these two architectural marvels is The Courtyard which, was the original Madison Ave. carriage entrance of the Villard Mansion. Quan sits amongst the ranks of famous actors and actresses. Television shows including, Law & Order, White Collar, and Gossip Girl shot scenes at the hotel. Furthermore, feature films such as Just My Luck and 27 Dresses filmed scenes in the Courtyard! 

Stop by 455 Madison Avenue on your commute home, or take a break from shopping down Madison Avenue to view this beautiful sculpture. 

Carole's Picks: Linda Cole by Carole Feuerman

by Kelsey Zalimeni

It is time yet again for a new edition in the Carole's Picks series. This month features established artist and Michigan native Linda Cole. Cole has spent time in Ann Arbor, New York, and London experimenting with textiles and design.  Over the years she developed a distinctive style which brought material and space into play with one another.  Her works are ethereal and imaginative, with a sound balance struck through structure and order.

'Rain'  (2011)

'Rain' (2011)

Cole works in large scale multimedia, often displayed as public installations.  Audiences are asked to engage with the pieces spatially, as they occupy a large portion of the display location.  One also considers the relation of parts to a whole in this encounter, admiring the small components of a work like 'Rain' and their role in the overall composition. 

'Elevated Air'  (2008)

'Elevated Air' (2008)

Cole continues to create these marvelous installations, exhibiting in cities all over the country and abroad.  For more information on this artist, visit her website HERE.

Send any comments or questions to info@carolefeuerman.com or post to the comment section below!

Beacon of Bliss by Carole Feuerman

by Kelsey Zalimeni

Between her cheerful yellow raincoat and content countenance, 'New York City Slicker' could be called a beacon of bliss.  This painted bronze serves a public purpose in both its presence and message, beautifying its installation site while inspiring goodwill and happiness amongst viewers.  

New York City Slicker, 2013    Painted Bronze, 63 x 35 x 28 inches,  Mana Contemporary Art Center

New York City Slicker, 2013

Painted Bronze, 63 x 35 x 28 inches, Mana Contemporary Art Center

The sheer mass of the piece commands attention, standing five feet and three inches from the equally tall concrete podium. Although it towers above any passersby, the figure does not intimidate or impose but rather invites further inspection through its pleasant palette and beautiful details.  'New York City Slicker' was first debuted at Mana Contemporary Art Center in 2013, where it quickly became a crowd favorite. Wherever the piece goes next, happiness is sure to follow.

Milestone Moment by Carole Feuerman

by Kelsey Zalimeni

Today in Sunnyvale, California a very special event will take place, marking an important moment for both the city and artist Carole Feuerman.  Tech powerhouse NetApp is unveiling Carole's monumental 'Double Diver,' a bronze beacon of balance, achievement, and trust dedicated to the city. 

L-  'Double Diver' , 2014- bronze with patina finish; R- Carole Feuerman perfecting the 'Double Diver'

L- 'Double Diver', 2014- bronze with patina finish; R- Carole Feuerman perfecting the 'Double Diver'

  For Sunnyvale, this occasion highlights a flourishing relationship between the community and the thriving NetApp corporation. For Carole, the honor of bestowing such a symbolic and prominent sculpture upon the city is both exhilarating and humbling. The ceremony, set to commence at 2pm Pacific time, is sure to be a glorious milestone for all parties involved. All in the area are encouraged to attend.

Slow Down by Carole Feuerman

by Kelsey Zalimeni

In this day and age, it seems we're always on the go. Our smartphones connect us to everything, everywhere and unplugging even for a moment threatens to deprive us of vital information or updates. Whatever happened to meditation, to stepping away for just a minute to breathe? Through her Balance series, Carole Feuerman reminds us to do just that.

Despite her busy schedule and demanding career, Carole has never lost sight of the importance of rest and reflection.  In Balance, we see the evocation of sound mind and soul- the figure is fixed in a state of repose and reverie. Her literal posture is set in Lotus, a classic meditation position for physical stability.  The ease of her curving silhouette reflects a powerful tranquility. 

Balance , 2008-2011   Oil on Resin, 36 x 32 x 18 inches, Collection of Lois Robbins, New York, NY

Balance, 2008-2011

Oil on Resin, 36 x 32 x 18 inches, Collection of Lois Robbins, New York, NY

Matisse once called art 'the armchair of life,' an experience through which people could escape their everyday worries.  The mere act of observing a work like Balance can take us to that place, stealing away to retreat if only for a few moments.

Carole's Picks: Shan Shan Sheng by Carole Feuerman

by Kelsey Zalimeni

This month’s feature in the Carole’s Picks series is Chinese artist Shan Shan Sheng. Coming to America in 1982, Sheng attended Mount Holyoke College and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, where she earned her Master of Fine Arts Degree, and continued to Harvard University as an artist-in-residence for two years. While she produces a range of works from Venetian glass to painting, Sheng is most well known for her public installations in major cities across the globe.

Sheng's sweeping installations are made of a colorful, specially cast glass; the arrangement of its parts evokes and imaginative take on the ethereal space above and within our reach. Witnessing a large-scale Sheng in person awakens a viewer to a higher awareness of their own body, in relation to the artwork itself and to the room which they both occupy.  Nature and its many wonders are a grand inspiration for the artist, as reflected in the organic composition of her works.

Shan Shan Sheng’s paintings are a near perfect embodiment of her sculptural works, giving off the same mystical, weightless feel through the language of color and movement.  Like her public pieces, Sheng’s paintings are grand in scale and of a similar palette to her cold-cast glass panes.